What’s Bookish Compassion?

“We’re Going to Need More Wine” by Gabrielle Union

“Bookish Compassion” could mean:

While reading, the guy at the other table starts streaming some stupid video on full blast. You give him the death stare, but he doesn’t get it.

You then think, “He’s a selfish prick and a goddamn public nuisance, I’m not.”

You then feel better about the noise and get back into reading.

(Not before blogging it, of course.)

Read: Ten Days in a Madhouse

Ten Days in a Madhouse by Nellie Bly

While reading this – I kept thinking – Wow. These evil nurses and doctors are worse than Guantanamo, Nazis and Mengele, Russian gulags, Iran-Iraq, DPRK and Chinese prison camps combined.

Why so, if you may ask? But before I go there… First, this was published in 1886. Also, you should read about Nellie Bly – She pioneered what we call today, “investigative journalism”. And her time is before Martha Gellhorn, before John Hersey.

So – why are these people more evil than the ones who came after them? Because… they were supposed to be caring for the mentally ill? Well. What do I know.

That’s all there is to it.

Read: Small Fry

This just in.

*spoiler alert* Though, I don’t write ‘review-reviews’. I write what I feel. Felt. Am feeling.

I cried toward the final 20% of the book.

Also, I have been sitting on Walter Isaacson’s bio on Steve Jobs since it was published. Now I know why.

It was meant to be sat on.

I’m not an Apple fan. I may have had a MacBook Air, have a MacBook Pro, used an iPhone 4, 5, owned two iPads and own two iPads, plus other Apple stuff; but I’m not a fan. I just buy things that appealed to me, randomly. I don’t idolize Steve Jobs (never cared about Apple launches). Brilliant, but I’d pick Anderson Cooper over him any second. And yeah as if I’d even ever get to do that.

I cried because of Kevin and Dorothy’s kindness. There’s a quote somewhere by someone random who said something along the lines of,

Lisa may one day realize she can never replace her parents, and Kevin and Dorothy can never buy a daughter.

What a stupid thing to say. Really. But you’ve been mentioned in her book so, congratulations, I guess?

The part where Steve’s bio on some corporate website mentioned he has three instead of four children.

The parts where her father keeps saying, or hints, “You need to be part of the family, Lis,” – I’m sorry, but isn’t that some form of gaslighting? The author’s so kind with her words. Probably doesn’t wanna upset her siblings, especially the youngest one, named Eve, because Eve said, out loud, “She was daddy’s mistake,” – Kids, they always say the darnest things and get away with it, though I hope, not for life. Eve, if you’re reading this, I hope you’ve since grown to realize that you could process thoughts before you speak.

It’s easy to read this bio without the late Steve Jobs hovering around the pages because I’ve never read much nor finished watching videos with Steve Jobs in it. I believe it has a lot to with my disliking of what’s ‘trending‘. I was working closely with consumer technology for over a decade and yet I couldn’t be bothered.

So, once again? Now I know why. Strange, but it’s so that I could dive in clean into this memoir of a wounded soul. I visualized her father as her father, first. Mostly, even. The way she wrote this memoir, it wasn’t about her father, who happens to be Steve Jobs.

It was about a child’s relationship with her father.

Did I know Steve Jobs was cruel towards his “mistake of an unwed family he didn’t want”? Not until I read this book.

Did I know he was stingy? Well, not really.

All I knew was that he was a genius with a temper, and had a kid he originally refused to acknowledge (paternity). That, was all.

So, for me, it’s as though all these years dealing with consumer tech and the media, I was miraculously saved from all these insignificant details, until Small Fry was written and published.

I’m glad, I’m really glad, that I had sat on Jobs, the biography.

I don’t know what kind of surprises will be waiting for me, but I hope it would address Steve’s parents (not much of the birth ones), their relationship, and how he came to be one of, well, the cold people his wife Laurene openly declared during a session with the author’s therapist (“We’re just cold people”, said Laurene. The author was also present during the session). I am also curious about Laurene. She’s gotta be his twin, otherwise, there’s no way their relationship had continued to work.

Despite all the negativity, I do agree with the author’s father on this, which is possibly (should damn be) the greatest quote by him, ever –

Passage taken from the book, chapter ‘Runaway’:

My father gave a speech in which he said that it wasn’t love that brought people together and kept them together, but values – shared values.

How’s Laurene not his twin, I will never be able to comprehend.

I’m drained from this read, in a good way, I suppose. I can never begin to imagine the sorrow she’s been carrying since she was a tiny, curious, hungry for acceptance, child. Ms. Brennan-Jobs, you will pay it forward. Thank you for sharing your story.

What Reading Spree?

“I just went on a reading spree!”

If you have days or times when you can ‘go on a reading spree’, well, I’m jealous of you, though not happy for you. There’s no happiness in seeing somebody, or anybody, for being able to read and read and read, and then, finish – done – next!

This book has been sitting on my dining table for two months. It’s not that I don’t want to finish it in one day or even within a week or two. The book is good. The author is fearless, passionate even, as she needs to interview talk to druglords who are incarcerated across few of the most notorious prisons in the world.

It’s funny how people pass comments like, wow, “You’re still reading that book?”, or, “You took that long to finish one book?”

It’s as if people who read don’t necessarily have lives beyond books (we wish we hadn’t, really), or, as if people who don’t read, knows what’s it like to actually spend quality time reading a book.

Some people could finish 700 pages in one setting, sure. They have different reading speeds, they could comprehend the context better, they didn’t have other commitments, they probably have no kids, grown kids who don’t need them, or they work in jobs that enables them to read, or they prefer to screw up their jobs and family or whatsoever so that they could read.

Who knows? Who are you to know?

I couldn’t read all day and night. Not even all day. There’s work, there’s chores, there’s kids, there’s texts to respond to otherwise they’ll call (which is worse) if you don’t respond.

Then there’s moody days and gloomy skies.

It’s so stupid, seeing bookworms belittling each other over “you just started that?! I finished that last month!”

Shut up, b*tch. Better, f*ck off.

This is why people are discouraged from reading. Well, at least one of the reasons. People just wouldn’t leave them alone.

If you come across a snobbish bookworm, send them the link to this post. May this be a STFU reminder for those morons.

“Reading sprees” are a privilege, never a right. Sure, neglect everything else and naturally everything will become a right for/to you. I hope our paths will never cross, and by that I mean literally and digitally.

Currently Reading: Small Fry

Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs

Having read about nomads*, I feel offended on their behalf. Why would people even bother to highlight this?

Is it so profound that I don’t get it, or what?

Please, somebody, anybody, enlighten me. I’d love a good joke, or a strict, no-b*llsh*t criticism for my ignorance.

*A quick example would be how certain tribes/nomads in Sudan would have to move around according to the season/weather to survive – humans and livestock. Not to mention civil unrest for generations – prompting some of them to live a nomadic life.

#IDGAF: Australia vs. ?

https://bookriot.com/?p=247526

Referring to the above subject ‘letter’, I have a few words too. Though I know it will never get any press and IDGAF.

The Sorcerer’s Stone. The Philosopher’s Stone.

ToMAYtoes.
ToMAHtoes.

Good question, though it only bothers maybe some Americans, likely some British, and certainly some Australians…

As for me… #IDGAF.
A good book is a good book.
Glamor or Glamour.
Whatever.Whatevah.

If the Americans wanna do it, it’s for their audience so let them be perhaps they can do whatever the f*ck they want.

I think.

Don’t like it, maybe consider not publishing your book in the US.

#LMFAO: Dispatches From The Other Side

Saw this today. It’s not funny. I’m not saying it’s funny. Because it’s not. Okay FFS. OF COURSE IT IS FUNNY!!! It is somewhat difficult for a nonfiction me (you see, I’m not even saying ‘nonfiction readers’) to comprehend it because I am people. And people are people, and people are mean pricks.

I have read quite a shelf full of distressing reads (FGM, torture, famine, rape, execution, you know, stuff that makes the world go around in circles). But to beg ask for books to emotionally destroy me would be quite, morbid. Sadistic, even.

The irony is – If that question came out of my mouth, I’d be damned. Especially if it’s in a nonfiction group. But of course, we’ll never be able bring ourselves to ask such a question. It’ll unlikely cross most of our minds to phase it that way, I reckon. Can you imagine people racing to recommend nonfiction five star reads that are emotionally destroying? That’s kinda f*cking, weird f*cked-up, no?

FFS, stop making fun of fiction, you mean prick!

But, wait. Nonfiction has been similarly mocked as boring as f*ck and prudish so let me have my I-am-superior post day, okay?

Without further mockery, let me think of imagine an emotionally destroying read for this young lady…

Okay. How about this: A chicklit (duh), where Barney’s goes bankrupt, the entire 5th Avenue is sold to a real estate tycoon who wishes to turn it into Wall Street #2, make-ups are banned across the bloody world, and the leading dashing and dapper bloke Ryan Reynolds look-alike marries the antagonist b*tch? Perhaps that would emotionally destroy this reader.

Nah. I gotta try harder next time.

p.s. This mean prick (yours truly, who else) will attempt to leave this group the minute a similar post pops up. But seriously, I still think I am having too much fun… So…